New dining service may be introduced

By Kienan O’Doherty, A&E Editor 

With Ohio Wesleyan growing bigger by the day, meeting student needs becomes more of a challenge.

Chartwells, which has been Ohio Wesleyan’s main food vendor since 2011, has been getting negative reviews from students and faculty alike, and soon may be out of another client, although nothing is certain yet.

The decision to put OWU’s dining program out for proposals has been in the works for a while and there are a lot of factors behind this decision, said Lauri Strimkovsky, vice president for finance and administration and treasurer.

“We made the decision to put our dining program out for proposals based on negative student feedback about the dining program, as well as the results of a study conducted by campus dining,” Strimkovsky said.

Senior Paul Heithaus, who has witnessed Chartwells change throughout his years at OWU, has seen little improvement, but said that food solutions are different for this generation of incoming students.

“I’ve seen a slow level of improvement in Chartwells during my time here,” Heithaus said. “With that said, I believe it’s time for Ohio Wesleyan to go in a different direction. The profile of the incoming student at OWU is evolving and the food solutions should naturally do the same.”

Junior Austin Strauss said he believes the diversity of food isn’t as big of a factor as it should be.

“To be honest, in the beginning it really wasn’t too great, then they made a few changes and it got a tiny bit better,” Strauss said. “Hamilton-Williams Marketplace (Ham-Will) has always had good food just not much diversity,and they seem to serve almost always the same thing. This year, for the omelettes, they don’t cook them in front of you either, which leads to the decline of student interaction with employees. Smith Hall for me just never seems to have high quality food, but the best part is when they cook food in front of you.

But he added that he thought there were some positives.

“The one thing I will say is Bishop Cafe has some of the best food on campus, with a decent selection, and daily changes in the special of the day,” Strauss said. “But overall, the food here has been very generic, and the food selection is pretty repetitive.”

Multiple administrators from OWU recently visited schools with top 10 dining programs to determine their decisions. Dwayne Todd, vice president for student engagement and success, saw many changes while visiting, particularly at schools he saw were similar to OWU.

“At two of the campuses, which are much like OWU, we observed that their main focus was on quality over quantity in terms of the menu offerings and amount of food on the line,” Todd said. “Dishes are chef-inspired and innovative. They are purchasing much of their ingredients from local suppliers and build the menu around what items are available at the time. A third campus we visited is a large state institution that is consistently ranked as the top program in the country, and while they also emphasize quality, they also pride themselves on variety and convenience.”

Strimkovsky also visited the top 10 schools with Todd and saw more students involved in the dining service as well.

“​We saw more made from scratch cooking, more use of locally sourced foods, higher quality of food offered, more students employed by the operation, meal plans that better met the student needs and hours of operation that better met the student needs,” Strimkovsky said.

Chartwells is still allowed to bid during the process, and Steve Ishmael, senior director of dining for Chartwells, said he fully believes in the relationship between the program and school.

“Chartwells is proud of our relationship with Ohio Wesleyan University and very much looks forward to being part of the bid process,” Ishamel said. “The University is making a smart business decision in ensuring they have the right partner for the future of dining at OWU.  We welcome the opportunity to tell our story and working to continue our partnership.”

Ishmael said he also believes that the some of the changes made this year have been a success.

“It is a continual process,” Ishmael said. “You can look around all of the facilities to see some of the physical changes we have made this year from painting, pictures and menu boards in Bishop Café, to the upgrades in Smith, plus the big efforts on social media to continue to keep students informed about what is happening in dining services.”

Chartwells has increased their salary every year since 2011, going from $4,956,674 that year to$6,163,317 in 2015.

“If Chartwells isn’t chosen in the bidding process, the school could lose money,” President Rock Jones said.

An in-house dining service could be a possibility to look into, but Strimkovsky said she believes it would be better long-term.

​An in house dining program could be a possibility in the future, but not in the short term,” Strimkovsky said. “Running a food service operation of this size is complicated and would need extensive strategic planning to bring on line. Our plan is put out the Request for Proposals, select a food service provider that is able to provide the quality food service program we want to offer to students.  We will then assess, down the road a year or so, whether we want to consider a self operating dining service.”

Men’s soccer team wins NCAC title in dramatic fashion

By Kienan O’Doherty, A&E Editor 

After one of the most exciting games in recent North Coast Athletic Conference (NCAC) memory, the Ohio Wesleyan men’s soccer team captured its 10th championship.

In a classic rivalry matchup between the second-seeded Battling Bishops and the top-seed Kenyon College Lords, the teams battled to a 0-0 draw after extra time, meaning the tournament would be decided by penalties.

After sophomore goalkeeper Mike Heeschen kept the Lords at bay throughout both regulation and extra time, notching five saves in 110 minutes, head coach Jay Martin leaned on sophomore J.P. Baughman to go in goal for the shootout.

“We planned on doing that since the very beginning,” Martin said. “Since high school, [Baughman] has been a very good penalty stopper.”

Baughman lived up to his reputation, saving three shots to keep the Bishops alive, and all the while setting up junior midfielder Jack Shadoan for the winning penalty. Shadoan converted, and the Lords missed their next penalty wide, earning the Bishops the tournament title. The win also gave the Battling Bishops an automatic birth into the NCAA tournament.

Baughman received the Most Valuable Player award in the tournament for his efforts. Four Bishops were named to the All-NCAC tournament team: Shadoan, Heeschen, Baughman and senior back and captain Trey Olsen.

It finally seems the Bishops are hitting their stride at the perfect time, and junior midfielder and captain Will Sharer believes that complacency is key:

“We need to keep working hard in practice and doing the little things that will make a difference in the games,” Sharer said. “I think if we can keep our hard working and defense first mindset then we can make a run in the [NCAA] tournament.”

The Bishops traveled to University Heights, Ohio for their first round matchup against John Carroll University, who beat the Bishops 5-4 in double overtime earlier in the season. Senior midfielder David Robinett said hethinks the team learned a lot the last game, and can’t wait to play them again.

“We learned that we need to play hard for the full 90 minutes, so that’s what you should expect this time,” Robinett said. “We know that we’re a talented team and we’re excited to come back and get revenge.”

Martin said he believes the Bishops can take on anybody in the tournament, including John Carroll.

“I’ll tell you what, I don’t think they want to play us,” Martin said. I think they want to play some other team.”

The first round matchup will take place on Friday, Nov. 10, at 5:30 p.m. at John Carroll, with the winner playing either Calvin College or Thomas More College on Saturday, Nov. 10 at 7 p.m.

HBC and Branch Rickey renovations coming soon

By Aleksei Pavloff, Sports Editor 

Ohio Wesleyan University administration approved plans to renovate the House of Black Culture and Branch Rickey Arena.

In late October, many alumni, students and parents enjoyed a festive homecoming while also celebrating the university’s 175th anniversary. With this celebration, the school also announced that OWU’s Connect Today, Create Tomorrow campaign raised more than $140 million in donations.

“Our goal for the leadership phase of the campaign had been $125 million,” said OWU president Rock Jones in an email sent to OWU faculty. “So this is, indeed, a milestone to celebrate.”

Along with the celebration, announcements were made that have some people on campus still celebrating. The Board of Trustees approved the rebuilding of the Butler A. Jones House of Black Culture (HBC) and plans to renovate Branch Rickey Arena.

This is a part of the university’s 2017-18 objectives and plan for 2020.

Through this approval, the board is aiming to raise at least $161 million for the Connect Today, Create Tomorrow campaign by late June 2018. Along with donations, the objective included completing fundraising and beginning construction of HBC. Along with the rebuilding of HBC, the objectives included finalizing the design for Branch Rickey and launching fundraising.

HBC has been a part of the OWU community since the 1970s. The current house is located on Oak Hill Avenue and Jones has said the new building will be in the same location.

He also added that students have assisted in reviewing plans for the new house in efforts to serve “the needs both of the students who live in the house and of the larger community that gathers at the house.”

With the announcements made about plans for HBC and Branch Rickey, some recent alumni are excited to hear about the news.

“I think it’s great that (Branch Rickey Arena) is getting renovated,” said Ben Simpson ‘17, a former member of the OWU basketball team.“This program that has been built over the years definitely deserves it.”

Simpson also mentioned that his memories of playing in Branch Rickey were great.

“It was awesome playing in Branch Rickey,” Simpson said. “The combination of great fans and a great atmosphere makes it fun to play in.”

Branch Rickey Arena is one of the best places to watch and play sports, but according to President Jones, it is time for improvements.

“The time has arrived when much-needed renovation must occur, including replacing the aging floor and bleachers, refreshing the entry and public restrooms, upgrading the training room, and creating a venue that reflects the quality of the programs that compete in Branch Rickey Arena,” Jones said.

The administration has worked with new athletic director Doug Zipp, coaches, trainers and faculty from the health and human kinetics department to identify what needs to be improved.

“This is the most pressing need for renovation among all of our athletics facilities,” said Jones.

The Historian to depart from OWU

By Kiersten Bender, Transcript Correspondent 

The editorial staff of The Historian are slowly clearing the shelves, editing one book at a time, in preparation to terminate a historical organization that has operated at Ohio Wesleyan University for 25 years. 

The Historian will be leaving OWU in the fall of 2018, ending 25 years of connecting students with universities, historians, and authors from all over the country. Richard Spall Jr., professor of history, has been the editor of the book review section of The Historian since it arrived at Ohio Wesleyan in 1993.

The Historian is a quarterly journal published by the national honor society for history, Phi Alpha Theta.

Phi Alpha Theta encourages the research, publication and teaching of history, which is why the journal includes articles and book reviews that discuss all fields of history.

The journal allows students, historians and teachers from around the world to make connections, according to The Historian’s website.

The contract with Phi Alpha Theta connecting OWU and The Historian included a six-year term with Spall as editor. Ending his fourth term, Spall is ready to pass the torch to someone else and continue teaching.

The journal was initially intended to leave in the fall of 2017.

But when the person who was intended to replace Spall as editor declined, the OWU staff had to keep the book review section operating for another year. Meanwhile, Phi Alpha Theta has been searching for a different editor willing to take on the responsibility.

Since its establishment in 1993, The Historian has provided Ohio Wesleyan students with $475,000 in scholarships and more than $1.3 million in books. In addition, 32,654 history books have been added to Beeghly Library.

“The history collection is as good or better than any other,” Spall said.

Along with the extensive list of contributions, The Historian has provided jobs to OWU students through work study opportunities provided by the school.

The OWU editorial staff currently includes six editorial assistants and four senior editorial assistants. Spall said the book review section has had up to 21 students working for it at one time.

Both junior Alyssa DiPadova and senior Kyle Rabung said their experiences as senior editorial assistants have provided them with skills and relationships that they would not have received anywhere else.

“I cannot stress enough how proud this campus should be over the 20 plus years of excellence that we have contributed to a nationally circulating academic journal,” Rabung said.

2018 WCSA election results announced

By Gopika Nair, Editor-in-Chief

The Wesleyan Council on Student Affairs (WCSA) has elected its first female black student body president.

Senior Cara Harris will serve as the WCSA president in 2018 and sophomore Peyton Hardesty was elected vice president.

The 2017 WCSA elections yielded other firsts, as well.

Compared to last year’s 29 percent, this year, 46 percent of the Ohio Wesleyan student body voted, which was “the highest turnout in memory,” said senior Chris Dobeck, current president of WCSA.

Additionally, junior Will Ashburn is the first elected treasurer since Graham Littlehale ‘17, who served as the WCSA treasurer in 2015.

“The election was incredibly close,” Dobeck said. “Of all four presidential tickets, the highest voted candidate and the lowest voted candidate only had a 37 vote difference.”

The election took place on Friday, Nov. 10.

The complete list of results are as follows:

President

Cara Harris

Vice President

Peyton Hardesty

Secretary

Mollie Marshall

Treasurer

Will Ashburn

Class of 2019 Representatives

Jackie Arnott

Megan Klick

Class of 2020 Representatives

Gretchen Weaver

Maxwell Aaronson

Class of 2021 Representative

Max Berry

Student Inclusion Advocacy Committee (SIAC) members

Cindy Hyunh

Ahmed Hamed

Mahnoor Ansari

Josselyne Ramirez

Benji Acuna

Daniela Black

Marisa Grillo

Spencer Zhang

 

Former Peace and Justice House sold

By Alameina White, Transcript Reporter 

The Perkins House, which formerly housed members of the House of Peace and Justice (P&J), has been sold because of a need for extensive renovations.

According to Lauri Strimkovsky, vice president for finance and administration and treasurer, after 30 years of being a part of Ohio Wesleyan University’s campus, the Perkins House has been sold because it is no longer being used as a residential spot for students.

“Rather than allow the building to sit empty and deteriorate, the decision was made to sell it and reinvest the proceeds into other residential life housing projects,” Strimkovsky said.

Members of the P&J House were moved to one of the new SLUplexes built last year, including three current seniors who previously resided in the Perkins House.

Ellen Sizer, Kieran Tobias and Izzy Taylor said they were glad to hear that someone bought the former P&J House instead of it being torn down.

“I think it’s good that it’s being sold, so that hopefully someone can clean it up and return it to what it was,” Taylor said. The residents have noticed a few changes since the site of the P&J House was moved.

Tobias said the former house didn’t have a television, and with the addition of TVs, the house has felt a bit more modern.

“The old house was like a portal into the 70s,” Tobias said. “When you walked in, all you saw were people drawing in sketchbooks or writing in their journals.”

Sizer added that since they moved to a newer house, they’ve attracted a new and wider range of students she doesn’t think would have notice the P&J House before.  ButTaylor said the house still holds positive vibes and great energy.

Though they are happy to see the house being sold instead of torn down, these seniors still hold memories in the house that can’t be replaced.

Last year, the house celebrated its 30-year anniversary and held a lunch with new and old members of the P&J House where everyone discussed their memories in the house and where life has led them. Tobias and Taylor said they enjoyed meeting generations of people as far back as the 90s who had shared the same home.

Sizer, though she doesn’t dwell on the past, said she will miss waking up in the quad in the former house.

“The greatest feeling was waking up from a nap in the quad and all you see is sun around you,” Sizer said. 

Each of the seniors, though sad to part with the former house, want to emphasize the point that the Peace and Justice House’s meaning is more important than the physical home.  

“As important and historical as the old house may have been, I think it’s the spirit of the house that matters more than anything,” Tobias said. 

Sizer said, “Our house did everything we could to live in it the longest we could and I am positive about the future.” 

Tuition to increase by 2.4 percent

By Spencer Pauley, Copy Editor 

Students at Ohio Wesleyan will start spending a little more money out of pocket next year because of a 2.4 percent increase in tuition.

Recently, it was decided at a Board of Trustees meeting that OWU would increase the yearly tuition from $44,430 to $45,500. They looked at the consumer price index of all urban consumers, which went up by 1.9 percent.

They also looked at OWU’s competitors, which includes private universities that students have applied to in addition to OWU.

OWU and its competitors saw college pricing go up by 3.6 percent on average last year.

Lauri Strimkovsky, vice president for finance and administration and treasurer, said the university has been trying to limit tuition increase over the years.

“Over time, we have really tried to keep the percentage increase as low as possible,” Strimkovsky said. “But the world around us changes and so the things we’re paying for go up around us, so it’s not possible to keep tuition static.”

Increasing tuition at OWU is not new for the university. But President Rock Jones said this year’s increase is small compared to ones in the past.

“This year’s increase is one of the smallest in the last 40 years and reflects the impact of inflation on our ability to provide the educational experiences our students and their families expect,” Jones said.

Junior Masai Tate said he is frustrated about the decision.

“I’ve struggled paying for college the past three years here,” Tate said. “I’m left wondering if this increase will prevent me from continuing studying [at OWU] next year.”

With the tuition increase, the Financial Aid staff plans on making sure students can afford to study at OWU.

“The Office of Financial Aid will continue to work with students and families to assist with their financial planning and their needs for financing an OWU education,” Jones said.

Annual contemporary dance concert set to premiere

By Kienan O’Doherty, A&E Editor 

As one of the most anticipated events of the year, Ohio Wesleyan’s annual contemporary dance concert will look to wow with its most interactive piece yet.

“Orchesis 17/18” aims to be unlike any other production in OWU history. For one thing, it has a title, “The Time it Takes.”

“‘The Time it Takes’ relates to how much time it takes to actually go through this space together,” Rashana Smith, assistant professor of theatre and dance, said. “Can we hint at, get at, invite a sense of belonging at different levels? Not everyone is going to feel a belonging in the same way.”

One interesting aspect of the performance to look forward to is that it’s one extended piece, instead of the multiple pieces past concerts have been. Also, the performance starts right when you walk in the door, rather than waiting for the audience to be seated.

Smith also brought in renowned performer Erik Abbott-Main as a guest choreographer, who said he  hopes his experience in immersive dance theatre will help these performers make it the best concert they can.

“I hope to supply some other techniques that I’ve developed over the years working in this genre and share it on to them,” Abbott-Main said.

The performance will also have no pauses in the show, making it around 50 minutes instead of the usual hour and 15 that previous concerts used to run.

The cast number is lower this year compared to previous years because only 16 students were able to perform. There happened to be a large level of interest, but scheduling conflicts got in the way.

Junior Kelly Coffyn, who has been to the past two concerts, said she is very excited for this installment.

“I really am excited to go because I love seeing people who I didn’t know were passionate about dancing do something they enjoy,” Coffyn said. 

“The Time it Takes” will be performed on the Main Stage inside the Chappelear Drama Center.

Tickets are $10 for general admission and $5 for senior citizens, Ohio Wesleyan employees, and non-OWU students. Admission is free for Ohio Wesleyan students with a valid OWU ID. Performance dates are Friday, Nov. 10 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 11 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.

As one of the most anticipated events of the year, Ohio Wesleyan’s annual contemporary dance concert will look to wow with its most interactive piece yet.

“Orchesis 17/18” aims to be unlike any other production in OWU history. For one thing, it has a title, “The Time it Takes.”

“‘The Time it Takes’ relates to how much time it takes to actually go through this space together,” Rashana Smith, assistant professor of theatre and dance, said. “Can we hint at, get at, invite a sense of belonging at different levels? Not everyone is going to feel a belonging in the same way.”

One interesting aspect of the performance to look forward to is that it’s one extended piece, instead of the multiple pieces past concerts have been. Also, the performance starts right when you walk in the door, rather than waiting for the audience to be seated.

Smith also brought in renowned performer Erik Abbott-Main as a guest choreographer, who said he  hopes his experience in immersive dance theatre will help these performers make it the best concert they can.

“I hope to supply some other techniques that I’ve developed over the years working in this genre and share it on to them,” Abbott-Main said.

The performance will also have no pauses in the show, making it around 50 minutes instead of the usual hour and 15 that previous concerts used to run.

The cast number is lower this year compared to previous years because only 16 students were able to perform. There happened to be a large level of interest, but scheduling conflicts got in the way.

Junior Kelly Coffyn, who has been to the past two concerts, said she is very excited for this installment.

“I really am excited to go because I love seeing people who I didn’t know were passionate about dancing do something they enjoy,” Coffyn said. 

“The Time it Takes” will be performed on the Main Stage inside the Chappelear Drama Center.

Tickets are $10 for general admission and $5 for senior citizens, Ohio Wesleyan employees, and non-OWU students. Admission is free for Ohio Wesleyan students with a valid OWU ID. Performance dates are Friday, Nov. 10 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 11 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.

Bishops upset nationally ranked Wabash Little Giants

By Spencer Pauley, Copy Editor 

It took 28 years, but Ohio Wesleyan’s football team finally beat the Wabash Little Giants, and did it against many odds.

On Oct. 14, the Battling Bishops traveled to Crawfordsville, Indiana and beat a Wabash team that was ranked 18th in the country prior to the game. OWU beat Wabash 16-13.

OWU football head coach Tom Watts gives credit to the defense for stepping up and not allowing an offensive touchdown by the Little Giants.

“Our defense has played unbelievably, they’ve played lights out,” Watts said.

Leading the OWU defense was safety Brad Brodeck and linebacker Cameron Smith. Brodeck had 13 tackles and a sack, while Smith had 11 tackles, two for a loss.

Offensively, OWU racked up 289 yards passing from Brian Berry. Wideout Deji Adebiyi led the team with 98 yards receiving. The one touchdown from OWU came from Berry to wideout Hunter Baker.

“Offensively, we’re really starting to click a little bit, which is nice to see,” Watts said.

Kyle Hogan, defensive end for OWU, racked up two blocked field goal attempts, which helped OWU stay in the lead over the ranked Little Giants. This earned Hogan a spot on D3football.com’s team of the week.

While the Battling Bishops were considered underdogs for the game, members of the team thought differently.

“We kept saying all week ‘shock everyone but ourselves,’” Smith said. “It gives us a lot of confidence moving forward because we’ve seen that we can play along with top level teams.”

The football team overcame a lot of adversity throughout the game week. The team bus even broke down and they had to wait for a new one.

“It was pretty neat to see our kids be resilient and overcome the adversity,” Watts said.

The Battling Bishops will face rivals Denison Big Red on Oct. 21 at 2 p.m. for OWU’s homecoming game. A win against a ranked team can provide momentum that the Battling Bishops need to defeat their rivals.

“A big win can go two ways; it can be a hangover for some teams or use it as an opportunity to take it to the next step,” Watts said.

The team believes they’re ready for the next step.

“We’ve known we’re good and we can play like this, now we’ve proved it,” Smith said. “We just gotta keep doing it.”

Gillespie Honors House dedicated during homecoming week

By Reilly Wright, Photo Editor 

The Gillespie Honors House, Ohio Wesleyan’s newest $2 million campus addition, houses 27 honors students, a variety of educational events and countless opportunities.

Located at 81 Oak Hill Ave., the house opened in August to sophomores, juniors and seniors part of the Leland F. and Helen Schubert Honors Program, who applied in the spring to reside in the new house.

The Gillespie Honors House was officially dedicated Thursday Oct. 19 during Ohio Wesleyan’s 2017 Homecoming and Family Weekend. President Rock Jones, Honors Program Director Amy McClure and the Gillespies were in attendance to speak at the crowded dedication.

The Gillespie Honors House moderator, junior Cindy Huynh, also spoke at the event showing her support for the house and its donors. As moderator, she works with housemates and the Honors Board to plan and host events at the spacious house.

“I believe that the Honors House is very unique and different from the other themed houses,” Huynh said. “We all have different backgrounds, perspectives and passions, which allows us to learn from each other. We all motivate and support each other to be the best that we can in order to reach our academic goals and aspirations.”

The student residence was built with funding from alumni Robert W. Gillespie ‘66, a key player in Cleveland banking industries, and his wife, Ann L. Wible Gillespie ‘67.

Both are still deeply involved in the university. Ann is a strong legacy, and Robert is an OWU Life Trustee and a board member of University Advancement, Finance and Operations, and Investments committees. Both are also members of the Founders’ Circle for their more than $1 million contribution and were involved in their 50th class reunions.

“Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie and their family are very passionate about students and their experience here at OWU,” Huynh said. “Their vision was to build and cultivate a community with the university’s best and brightest minds from now and for many more generations.”

In addition to their $2 million contribution for the house, their gift included another $500,000 for the Ann Wible Gillespie Endowed Scholarship, the Jack Dawson Scholarship and the Ohio Wesleyan Fund to sponsor campus operations.

In Ann’s dedication speech, she told of her grandson questioning their major donation to the university when there were programs such as cancer research to support.

“I think I said something like ‘You know, it seems to me that all real progress starts with education … for the most part, this is the core for getting our country and the world where it needs to be,’” Robert said.